Face Covering Policy

All personnel entering the cemetery will be required to provide proof of having face coverings in their possession during entry screening. Personnel not able to provide proof of having face coverings or masks in their possession will not be allowed to enter the cemetery. Visitors will wear their face coverings at all times while in the cemetery.

 
Published on Thursday, August 6, 2020
Website Maintenance

Several services across the ANC website and ANC Explorer are currently unable to send emails. This includes the Initiate Ceremony Request, Lost and Found, and Feedback Forms. We are working to restore this functionality and appreciate your patience.

 
Published on Monday, August 3, 2020

Renovations for Sections 33 and 60

By TIMOTHY JAMES LAWSON on 8/7/2020

If you ever notice sections of Arlington National Cemetery (ANC) stripped of their lush green grass, just know that they appear that way for an important reason. “It’s turf renovation,” explained Stephen Van Hoven, who has been ANC’s chief of horticulture for the last nine years. “We do about 30 acres every year.” As a national shrine, and a Level Three arboretum, ANC maintains its grounds to national shrine standard.

Lest We Forget: The Coast Guard War Memorial at Arlington National Cemetery (part 2)

By TIMOTHY JAMES LAWSON on 8/4/2020

Today, August 4, is the 230th birthday of the United States Coast Guard. In honor of those Coast Guardsmen who gave their lives during World War I, a memorial was erected at Arlington National Cemetery in 1928.

Lest We Forget: The Coast Guard War Memorial at Arlington National Cemetery

By TIMOTHY JAMES LAWSON on 8/3/2020

As part of the United States Coast Guard’s (USCG) 230th birthday celebration, we are highlighting the history of the Coast Guard War Memorial at Arlington National Cemetery with a series of guest blog posts from the USCG. These posts tell the story of the Coast Guard War Memorial and its significant role in honoring and remembering the heroism and ultimate sacrifices made by Coast Guardsmen during the First World War.

Arlington National Cemetery Launches Education Program

By TIMOTHY JAMES LAWSON on 7/28/2020

Arlington National Cemetery (ANC) is proud to announce its new Education Program, developed for virtual and in-person learning. Audiences of all ages may now discover the diverse history of the United States through the unique lens of ANC.

Secretaries of State at ANC: Alexander Haig, Four-Star Diplomat

By TIMOTHY JAMES LAWSON on 7/26/2020

In honor of the State Department’s birthday, today we examine the life and legacy of Alexander Haig (1924-2010), a four-star general who served as President Ronald Reagan’s first secretary of state.

The American Revolution at ANC: How Veterans of America’s First Conflict Came to Arlington

By JENIFER LEIGH VAN VLECK on 7/4/2020

For many years after Arlington National Cemetery’s establishment on May 13, 1864, Civil War service members were the only veterans buried at the cemetery. Today, however, service members who fought in all U.S. conflicts lay at rest on these hallowed grounds, including veterans of wars that predated the establishment of Arlington as a military cemetery. On Independence Day, we take a look at how these veterans of earlier wars—including the American Revolution, the War of 1812 and the U.S.-Mexican War—came to rest at Arlington.

Not Forgotten: The 70th Anniversary of the Korean War at ANC

By JENIFER LEIGH VAN VLECK on 6/30/2020

This year marks the 70th anniversary of the beginning of the Korean War (1950-1953)—the United States’ first major military conflict after World War II and, amid the escalating Cold War between the U.S. and the Soviet Union, the nation’s first major test in its effort to stop the global spread of communism. In American culture, the Korean War has often been called “the forgotten war,” overshadowed both by the victories of World War II and the traumas of Vietnam. Here at Arlington National Cemetery, however, the many gravesites of Americans who served in Korea, as well as several memorials to those who lost their lives in the conflict, ensure that the Korean War will always be remembered.

Commemorating the Nurses of the 1918 Influenza Pandemic

By JENIFER LEIGH VAN VLECK on 6/12/2020

As our nation and the world face the COVID-19 pandemic, ANC’s team of historians has been looking back at another health crisis and reflecting upon how it impacted Arlington National Cemetery: the influenza pandemic of 1918 to 1919. We highlight the role of female military nurses during the influenza pandemic and how they are commemorated on Arlington’s memorial landscape. 

ANC Remembers One of Thousands Who Sacrificed All on D-Day

By TIMOTHY JAMES LAWSON on 6/5/2020

In honor of the 76th anniversary of D-Day, the Allied invasion of Normandy, France, on June 6, 1944, we remember one of the thousands of ordinary Americans and Allies who sacrificed their lives in the long effort to liberate Europe during World War II.

Charles Young: From Enslavement to a Memorial Amphitheater Funeral

By JENIFER LEIGH VAN VLECK on 6/1/2020

When the Arlington Memorial Amphitheater was finished in 1920, it began to host funerals for famous service members as well as national observances such as Memorial Day. One of the first funerals held in the Amphitheater was for Colonel Charles Young (1864-1922), the first African American colonel in the U.S. Army.