Wreath laying ceremony at the Coast Guard Memorial

Wreath laying ceremony at the Coast Guard Memorial

Members of the U.S. Coast Guard Ceremonial Honor Guard wait for the start of a wreath laying ceremony at the Coast Guard Memorial at Arlington National Cemetery, Nov 11, 2015, in Arlington, Va. Members of the Coast Guard laid a wreath at the memorial during a ceremony on Veterans Day.

 

Photograph by Rachel Larue

Fall Beauty at Arlington

Fall Beauty at Arlington

Leaves change on trees in Section 21 of Arlington National Cemetery. These hallowed grounds have long been recognized as a place of honor for those who have served our nation. The cemetery's 624 acres are a unique blend of formal and informal landscapes, dotted with more than 8,600 native and exotic trees.

 

Photograph by Rachel Larue

Honoring the USS Cole

Honoring the USS Cole

Sailors from the U.S. Navy Ceremonial Guard take part in a ceremony Oct. 12, 2015, to remember the 17 American Sailors killed during the terrorist attack against the USS Cole. U.S. Navy Cmdr. Kirk S. Lippold, who spoke during the ceremony, commanded the USS Cole at the time of the attack, which happened at 11:18 a.m. Oct. 12, 2000.

 

Photograph by Rachel Larue

WWII aircraft honor Disabled American Veterans

WWII aircraft honor Disabled American Veterans

World War II era aircraft, T-6 “Texans” and a B-25 Mitchell Bomber, fly over Arlington National Cemetery and the Pentagon Oct. 9, 2015. The flyover was in honor of Disabled American Veterans and “pays tribute to the services and sacrifices veterans have made to secure our nation’s freedom,” according to the event announcement.

 Photograph by Rachel Larue


Cannon and carriage reinstalled in Section 1

Cannon and carriage reinstalled in Section 1

Employees Bryan Knepper, right, preservation specialist, and Randy Coy, motor vehicle operator, from Gettysburg National Military Park, guide a Civil War era cannon onto a carriage at the grave of Maj. Gen. Wallace Fitz Randolph in Section 1 of Arlington National Cemetery, Sept. 30, 2015. Randolph was born June 11, 1841, and died Dec. 9, 1910. "This is a government issued headstone that we are repairing because of safety issues,” said Rebecca Stevens, ANC cultural resources manager.

Photograph by Rachel Larue  


All-female Honor Flight

All-female Honor Flight

Women from the first all-female Honor Flight in the United States watch a Changing of the Guard ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery, Sept. 22, 2015. Seventy five female veterans from World War II, Korean War and Vietnam War were in attendance, as well as 75 escorts, who were also female veterans or active-duty military.

Photograph by Rachel Larue

Wreath laying at Rough Riders Monument

Wreath laying at Rough Riders Monument

Re-enactors from the West Virginia Rough Riders take part in a wreath laying ceremony at the Rough Riders Monument in Arlington National Cemetery, Sept. 19, 2015. The First U.S. Volunteer Cavalry, also known as the Rough Riders, was the most famous fighting unit fighting in Cuba during the Spanish-American War and was lead by Theodore Roosevelt, according to the Library of Congress.

 

Photograph by Rachel Larue

United Kingdom’s Minister of State for Armed Forces lays a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

United Kingdom’s Minister of State for Armed Forces lays a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

Brion Moore, deputy superintendent for Cemetery Operations, speaks with Penny Mordaunt, the United Kingdom’s Minister of State for Armed Forces, and Maj. Gen. Richard Cripwell, Defence Attache and Head of British Defence Staff - United States, before a wreath laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

 

Photograph by Rachel Larue

Then & Now - U.S. Coast Guard Memorial

Then & Now - U.S. Coast Guard Memorial

The black and white portion of this photo (on the left) was taken Nov. 9, 1928, at the U.S. Coast Guard Memorial on Arlington National Cemetery. The color portion of the photograph (on the right) was taken from a similar location this week.

 

According to the original caption for the historic photo, Mrs. I.W. Buckalow (far right) of Sault Ste Marie, Michigan, and other members of the League of Coast Guard Women, placed a wreath on the memorial.

 

The Coast Guard Memorial was dedicated May 23, 1928. Above the Coast Guard motto Semper Paratus, meaning "Always Ready", is a bronze seagull with its wings uplifted. The seagull symbolizes the tireless vigil that the U.S Coast Guard maintains over the nation's maritime territory.

 

(Historic photo belongs to the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division. Current photo by Arlington National Cemetery photographer Rachel Larue. Photo illustration by Rachel Larue.)